The Penitential Rite


To continue our series on the different parts of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, we continue to examine the Introductory Rites and take a look at the "The Penitential Rite.”

"Then the priest invites those present to take part in the Act of Penitence, which, after a brief pause for silence, the entire community carries out through a formula of general confession. The rite concludes with the priest's absolution, which, however, lacks the efficacy of the Sacrament of Penance." (GIRM, 51)

The history of asking for forgiveness at the start of Mass is very long and rich and started with Christ at the Last Supper:

"In the primitive Church, which had its roots in the heart of Christ, there was a spontaneous sense of the soul's need to ask for pardon at the beginning of Mass. (And, indeed, it seems that there may have then existed a penitential rite like the washing of the disciple's feet by Jesus before the Last Supper.) 
"The Roman Missal as drawn up in 1570 [formalized the need to ask pardon before Mass and] constructed [the rite] in the dramatic manner associated with the four states of a trial: the soul appears before the bar of justice, the soul confesses its guilt, the advocates plead, and pardon is granted. This is a public collective prayer in which priest and people...acknowledge their sinfulness, not just privately, but in the face of the whole Church, of all her saintly witnesses, and even in the face of the very powers of Heaven." (This is the Mass, 32)

The current translation of the Penitential Rite not only "better reflects the Latin text of the Mass [it also] helps us cultivate a more humble, sorrowful attitude toward God as we confess our sins. Instead of simply saying that I have sinned 'through my own fault' as we have in the old translation, we...now repeat it three times while striking our breasts in a sign of repentance, saying 'Through my fault, through my fault, through my most grievous fault.' This repetition more fully expresses our sorrow over sin...This prayer in the liturgy helps us recognize that sinning against God is no light matter. We must take responsibility for whatever wrong we have done and whatever good we failed to do." (A Guide to the New Translation of the Mass, 11)

Henri Daniel-Rops describes the symbolism of the Penitential Rite best when he writes:

“The thrice repeated act of deep repentance, at [through my fault], when the hand strikes the breast in an old biblical and monastic gesture, brings consolation to the sinner in his racking sorrow; for is it not written that the prayer of the humble shall be heard before the Most High? (Ecclus. 35:21) (This is the Mass, 32)

The next time you attend Mass and recite these words, envision yourself at the Last Supper, begging pardon from Jesus, before he hand you the bread that is His body.

I confess to almighty God,
and to you, my brothers and sisters,
that I have greatly sinned in my thoughts and in my words,
in what I have done
and in what I have failed to do,
[strike breast while saying]
through my fault,
through my fault,
through my most grievous fault;
therefore I ask blessed Mary ever-Virgin,
all the Angels and Saints,
and you, my brothers and sisters,
to pray for me to the Lord our God.

Volunteers Needed for New Committees

Volunteers needed to form a Picnic Committee and a new Directory Committee. Please contact parish office if interested.

The Catechesis of the Good Shepherd Class: 10:00-11:30 on Tuesdays/ 2nd Class: 4:00-5:30 on Tuesdays September: 13th is Open House September: 20th will be the first session Any Questions? Call Rosemary Hokamp, OLQH, 715-423-1251, or Peg Klinkhammer, 715-569-4271 Email: reoffice@solarus.net

Adoration at the Marian Center Please help fill Open Hours:
  • Tuesday 1 a.m. until 9-13-16 
  • Wednesday 1 a.m. 
  • Thursday 1 a.m. every other Thursday 
  • Saturday 5 p.m. 6 p.m., 3 a.m. every other Saturday 
  • 2nd person needed: 
    • Saturday 4 a.m. 3 p.m. 7 p.m. 8 p.m.
Contact Dan McCarville to fill open hours dancovey@wctc.net

Gethsemane at SS Peter and Paul “Pay your sacrifice of thanksgiving to God and render Him your votive offerings. Call on Him in the day of distress ...” and He will heal the wounds in your life, your family, our country, and our Church. Join us at the Gethsemane of SS Peter and Paul every Thursday night from 11 p.m. to 2:30 a.m. Call Jeff Ashbeck 715-451-0619 or Tony Biolo 715-213-4571.

Thousands Gather at Berlin March for Life to Say ‘No Child Is Unsuitable’

News from the USCCB
Worldwide Day Of Prayer For Sexual Abuse Survivors- WASHINGTON—Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Kentucky, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, welcomed Pope Francis' call for a World Day of Prayer for Victims of Sexual Abuse and highlighted the efforts in dioceses across the country guided by the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People...Read More

News from the Pope: 
Pope tells us 'not to judge, not to condemn, but to forgive' -(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis urged the faithful to be as merciful as the Lord, because – he said – that is the best way to be “a sign, a channel, a witness of His love”. He was speaking on Wednesday morning during the weekly General Audience in St. Peter’s Square....Read More

News from the Church: 
Thousands Gather at Berlin March for Life to Say ‘No Child Is Unsuitable’ - BERLIN — More than 7,500 people took part in the annual March for Life in Berlin on Saturday, under the motto: “No Child is Unsuitable.” The peaceful gathering was organized by the Federal Association for the Right to Life. Participants held aloft placards supporting the right to life from conception to natural death.
Five bishops took part in the event: Bishop Rudolf Voderholzer of Regensburg, who also celebrated the closing ecumenical Church service, Berlin's Archbishop Heiner Koch, and Auxiliary Bishops Matthias Heinrich of Berlin, Dominikus Schwaderlapp of Cologne, and Florian Wörner of Augsburg.....Read more

The Introductory Rites


"The Eucharist is 'the source and summit of the Christian life.'"The other sacraments, and indeed all ecclesiastical ministries and works of the apostolate, are bound up with the Eucharist and are oriented toward it. For in the blessed Eucharist is contained the whole spiritual good of the Church, namely Christ himself, our Pasch." 
"[The Eucharist] is the culmination both of God's action sanctifying the world in Christ and of the worship men offer to Christ and through him to the Father in the Holy Spirit."
"Finally, by the Eucharistic celebration we already unite ourselves with the heavenly liturgy and anticipate eternal life, when God will be all in all." (CCC 1324-26)
The celebration of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass has been "the source and summit" of our lives as Catholics ever since Christ's sacrifice upon the Cross. As a result, it is "right and just" to put emphasis on the celebration of such great a mystery that unites us to the cross of Christ and to heaven itself.

Unfortunately, many of us do not understand the gravity of a Mass and how it can truly change our lives. It is easy to get caught "going through the motions" and so that is why we will be spending the next few weeks explaining the vital importance of the Mass and taking you step by step into the most profound meeting of heaven and earth.

We will start at the beginning of Mass, with what is called the "Introductory Rites."
"The rites preceding the Liturgy of the Word, namely the Entrance, Greeting, Act of Penitence, Kyrie, Gloria, and Collect, have the character of a beginning, introduction, and preparation. Their purpose is to ensure that the faithful who come together as one establish communion and dispose themselves to listen properly to God's word and to celebrate the Eucharist worthily." (General Instruction of the Roman Missal, GIRM 46)
The Entrance: "After the people have gathered, the Entrance chant begins as the priest enters with the deacon and ministers." (GIRM, 47)

This entrance procession before the liturgy begins has a rich history as is related by Henri-Daniel Rops:
"In the early days of the Roman Church, the Pope went from the Lateran Palace in a solemn cortege of his attendant clergy, deacons, and acolytes, to the particular sanctuary in which Mass was, that day, to be said...In it lies the origin of the processional entrance. Psalms were chanted by alternating choirs...psalms which were specially chosen for their consonance with the underlying intention of the particular day's sacrifice....Thus the Introit [also called the Entrance Antiphon] became an entrance-song...which, by a few brief words, states the theme or point of emphasis of the Mass." (This is the Mass, 40)
Currently in the Church, we retain the tradition of reciting or singing a psalm as the "Entrance Antiphon" which is based on the theme for the Mass of the day. In the GIRM, there are four options that are permissible to worthily celebrate the entrance procession:
(1) the antiphon from the Roman Missal or the Psalm from the Roman Gradual as set to music there or in another musical setting; (2) the seasonal antiphon and Psalm of the Simple Gradual; (3) a song from another collection of psalms and antiphons, approved by the Conference of Bishops; (4) a suitable liturgical song similarly approved by the Conference of Bishops or the Diocesan Bishop.
If there is no singing at the entrance, the antiphon in the Missal is recited either by the faithful, or by some of them, or by a lector."
The Church encourages parishes to sing the Introit in English. The Church Music Association of America has been working on a project to offer these English Introits to all parishes and can be found here. However, it is also permissible to select a hymn that reflects the general theme of the day. This helps those present at Mass to prepare and presents a sort of "prelude" to the readings that will be read.

CCD Classes Begin Wednesday!

Saints Peter and Paul 2016-2017 CCD Registration

CCD CLASSES BEGIN SEPTEMBER 21

Single-student families: $60.00
Multiple-student families: $60.00 for the first child and $30.00 for each additional child.

REGISTER EARLY!!
A $30.00 late fee, per student, is required for registrations received after September 1, 2016.

Send registration forms to: Michael Peeters 3931 Alpine Way, Wisconsin Rapids, WI 54494 or drop off at the parish office.



The Catechesis of the Good Shepherd Class: 10:00-11:30 on Tuesdays/ 2nd Class: 4:00-5:30 on Tuesdays September: 13th is Open House September: 20th will be the first session Any Questions? Call Rosemary Hokamp, OLQH, 715-423-1251, or Peg Klinkhammer, 715-569-4271 Email: reoffice@solarus.net

Adoration at the Marian Center Please help fill Open Hours:
  • Tuesday 1 a.m. until 9-13-16 
  • Wednesday 1 a.m. 
  • Thursday 1 a.m. every other Thursday 
  • Saturday 5 p.m. 6 p.m., 3 a.m. every other Saturday 
  • 2nd person needed: 
    • Saturday 4 a.m. 3 p.m. 7 p.m. 8 p.m.
Contact Dan McCarville to fill open hours dancovey@wctc.net

Gethsemane at SS Peter and Paul “Pay your sacrifice of thanksgiving to God and render Him your votive offerings. Call on Him in the day of distress ...” and He will heal the wounds in your life, your family, our country, and our Church. Join us at the Gethsemane of SS Peter and Paul every Thursday night from 11 p.m. to 2:30 a.m. Call Jeff Ashbeck 715-451-0619 or Tony Biolo 715-213-4571.

Benedict XVI Is Pleased With ‘New Freshness in the Church, a New Joy’

News from the USCCB
USCCB Religious Liberty Chairman Responds To Statement Of Chairman Of U.S. Commission On Civil Rights - WASHINGTON—Archbishop William E. Lori of Baltimore, chairman of the U.S. bishops' Ad Hoc Committee for Religious Liberty, responded to a statement issued last week by the chairman of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights upon the issuance of its report on "Peaceful Coexistence." ...Read More
News from the Pope: 
Pope Francis: 'to kill in the name of God is satanic' -(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Wednesday morning celebrated Mass for the French priest of Rouen, Fr. Jacques Hamel, whom he described, is part of the chain of Christian martyrs that runs throughout the history of the Church. Father Hamel was murdered while celebrating Mass in his Parish Church by two men swearing allegiance to the so-called Islamic State in July.....Read More
News from the Church: 
Benedict XVI Is Pleased With ‘New Freshness in the Church, a New Joy’ -  MUNICH — Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI has said he is satisfied with the papacy of Pope Francis and sees “no contradictions” between their pontificates. “Yes, there is suddenly a new freshness in the Church, a new joy, a new charisma that addresses the people, which is something beautiful. Many are thankful that the new pope now approaches them in a new style. The Pope is the pope; it doesn’t matter who it is,” Benedict said in his newly published collection of interviews....Read more

Understanding the Ancient Liturgy of our Salvation

By Axilera at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0

Often when we go to Mass it is easy to slip into the habit of "going through the motions."

We stand. We sit. We kneel. We leave.

Nothing much changes week-to-week, besides some extra flowers and maybe a different color.

What is the whole point? Why do we we stand, sit, kneel and receive Holy Communion?

In order to answer that question, over the next several weeks we will be walking through the Mass, going through the symbolism that is present in the celebration. Hopefully this will open your eyes anew to this ancient liturgy and will help you stop "going through the motions" and recognize that you are participating in something much greater than yourselves.

In fact, what you are doing today at Sunday Mass is not much different than what the early Christians did in the 2nd century, almost 2,000 years ago!

If you want evidence, here is a passage from Saint Justin Martyr, who wrote in 155 AD about the common celebration of the liturgy:

"No one may share the Eucharist with us unless he believes that what we teach is true, unless he is washed in the regenerating waters of baptism for the remission of his sins, and unless he lives in accordance with the principles given us by Christ. 
"On Sunday we have a common assembly of all our members, whether they live in the city or the outlying districts. The recollections of the apostles or the writings of the prophets are read, as long as there is time. When the reader has finished, the president of the assembly speaks to us; he urges everyone to imitate the examples of virtue we have heard in the readings. Then we all stand up together and pray. 
"On the conclusion of our prayer, bread and wine and water are brought forward. The president offers prayers and gives thanks to the best of his ability, and the people give assent by saying, “Amen”. The eucharist is distributed, everyone present communicates, and the deacons take it to those who are absent. 
"The wealthy, if they wish, may make a contribution, and they themselves decide the amount. The collection is placed in the custody of the president, who uses it to help the orphans and widows and all who for any reason are in distress, whether because they are sick, in prison, or away from home. In a word, he takes care of all who are in need. 
"We hold our common assembly on Sunday because it is the first day of the week, the day on which God put darkness and chaos to flight and created the world, and because on that same day our savior Jesus Christ rose from the dead. For he was crucified on Friday and on Sunday he appeared to his apostles and disciples and taught them the things that we have passed on for your consideration."
Did anything sound familiar? Look back and see if you can identify these part of the Mass:

Introductory Rites
- Penitential Rite
Liturgy of the Word
-Readings
-Homily
-Profession of Faith
-Collection
Liturgy of the Eucharist
-Presentation of the Gifts and Preparation of the Altar
-Prayer over the Offerings
-Eucharistic Prayer
-Reception of Communion
-Dismissal

Over the next several weeks we will dive into each part of the Mass and discover the symbolism behind the ancient rites and discover the beauty and glory of the Mass anew.



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